Category Archives: anime club

Anime Club: Lucky Star Jars

stars

What We Did:

When Courtney, our Youth Services tech who will be taking over Anime Club and Fan Club soon, suggested doing folded paper stars for Anime Club, I was immediately on board. They’re so cute! And also very easy. I  knew, though, that the teens would need a little more structure to keep their attention for the full hour. So I suggested Lucky Star Jars – we provide the paper and the jars, and they fold enough stars to fill them up and look adorable.

Then, as usually happens, I was stymied at the craft store. Jars are pretty expensive! (I later learned I could have grabbed a flat of small mason jars at a big box store like Target for pretty cheaply.) Not wanting to blow our whole budget forever on plain glass jars, and without enough time to scavenge enough jars from the thrift store, I strolled through the aisles of the store, looking for something that would work. Since it was mid-November, there were already a ton of Christmas things out (OF COURSE). So, I grabbed two packs of clear glass ornaments, and was on my way.

What We Bought:

$20 for 2 12 packs of plain ornaments (similar to these)

That’s it! We used paper we had on hand for the stars.

How It Went:

Did you know I’m terrible at folding paper? It’s true! My stars all looked like little lumps, but many of the teens were more successful than I was, and their ornaments looked so great filled with multicolored or uniform stars. Some teens decided to just fill their ornaments with scraps of paper, or curled strips of paper. Works for me! Everyone left happy, and this was a relatively cheap program.

Anime Club: Terrariums

What I Did:

This Anime Club is an example of how if you don’t plan ahead and buy supplies before the day of your program, you might run into a snag! But it’s also an example of how everything will be fine anyway. So, my program started, as nearly all my programs do, with an idea I saw on Pinterest (are you noticing this theme? It’s because it’s so easy for my visual self to scroll through Pinterest and find things that sound fun!) I saw this great spice bottle terrarium craft at The Art of Making, and I thought, that sounds cool! I figured we could watch The Secret World of Arrietty, because it’s all about tiny things.

So, I set out for the store to get some spice bottles, but on the way, I passed a thrift store. I am constitutionally unable to actually pass a thrift store, and while I was in there, I noticed all manner of cute glass containers. I figured it’s cool to use recycled  materials when I can, and if I got little containers from the thrift, everyone could have something unique! so, I bought about a dozen vases, former candle containers, and glasses, and I was set (also I bought some adorable new dresses, but that’s beside the point).

I had some potting soil on hand at home that I was willing to donate, and we had plenty of sand, rocks, and glass stones left over from previous programs that I was happy to leave out. All I needed now were some adorable succulents, right? So out I head to Lowe’s. Except did you know that succulents are really expensive, and that if you shop for them in September the selection stinks! I DO NOW! So I just looked around and ended up picking some other plants.

What I Bought:

$12 for fifteen glass containers at Goodwill (color of the week for the win!)
$6 for twelve fuzzy looking plants
$12 for twelve spikey colorful looking plants (sorry that’s not more specific. I have a black thumb, and am not really up on my plant IDs)
Potting soil on hand
Glass beads on hand

So, total outlay for this program was about $30 for enough supplies for fifteen kids, which works out to about $2 per teen. If you planned ahead, I think you could put out the call for donations and scrounge up the glass containers for free. I think most people have some random vases or pickle jars around that they would be happy to unload on ya.

How It Went:

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This teen has decided that she’s going to pose like that every week for our Anime Club recaps. EPIC.

The root balls for the plants I chose ended up being a little too large for some of the containers, and nobody made Pinterest-worthy art. But I think the teens who don’t get to do outside stuff much appreciated learning what the roots of the plants are (geez, it makes me sad to type that) and everybody was excited to take something home. I’m 100% sure these plants will all be dead within six weeks, but hey, you win some, you lose some.

I had fifteen teens at this Anime Club, what what! We’ve got a couple of middle schoolers who have been coming and told their friends to come, and some older teens who have become regulars who also showed up. It’s so hard to know how much to buy for Anime Club, because sometimes I have two teens, and sometimes I have a dozen! We ran out of glass containers because at about halfway through the hour, I let some early comers make an extra terrarium. Of course, that meant five more teens came in right then and we ran out. Oh well! Everyone seemed to have fun, although I had to shut down a couple of inappropriate jokes from one of the younger teens. I know that’s one of the reasons that teen programming is so important, though – having a place to hang out outside of school that is semi-structured is a big deal and definitely meeting their developmental needs.

Anime Club: Pancake Sushi

What I Did:

Like many of my programs, this one was born on Pinterest. I saw this sweet pin of waffle sushi, and I definitely thought it was something that sounded fun (and delicious!) Even though I have a solid budget for teen programming, though, I just couldn’t justify buying a pizzelle maker that we would probably only use once. I can think of a hundred uses for an electric skillet, though, so I figured we could just use pancakes instead of waffles and it would still be delicious!

What I Bought:

$20 electric skillet
$4 for two containers of whipped cream cheese – one plain and one berry
$2 for complete pancake mix (generic, yo!)
$1 for a spatula (you might already have one of these on hand if you do cooking programs a lot!)
$2 for some syrup
$2 for a container of strawberries
$2 for a bunch of bananas

Total, about $33 for supplies, with about two thirds of that going toward equipment (the skillet and the spatula) that we can use again and again. If you do cooking programs with your teens already, you might have these things on hand, which would make this a pretty darn cheap program.

How It Went:

IMG_2793 IMG_2794 Teen poses with awesome pancake sushi roll IMG_2797

This was my first Anime Club since school is back in session; we are on programming pause for August to give us time to recover. I was a little scared that not many teens would show up – what if my healthy summer numbers were just a fluke? What if the teens hated me? WHAT IF I’M A SMELLY LOSER?

Welp, apparently none of that is true. We had a nice crowd of about 10 teens, with a few newcomers and a good bunch of regulars. I had a teen help me measure out the mix and water (life skills!); we made sure to add a little more water than suggested to make a loose batter for better rolling. I set a teen with some knife skills to cutting the strawberries and bannanas into slices. I manned the skillet, and my flipping skills were put to the test. Some of the pancakes were more…beautiful…than others, but all were tasty. The teens had a lot of fun spreading the cream cheese on their pancakes and adding fruit. They also had a lot of fun mocking my flipping failures, but that’s life. Some teens ended up making more pancake taco, but hey, it’s still delicious in my book!

Anime Club: DIY Figurines

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So, I am forever having the hardest time coming up with something for the teens to do during Anime Club. I know all the basics (candy sushi, bubble magnets with discarded manga, perler beads…) and my awesome co-worker who I took over the program from did so many cool things (painting lanterns, screen printing, suminagashi…) that I really feel like it’s all been done before. I’m stretching to think of new fun things the teens can noodle around with while we put on the first episode of an anime.

This week, we made anime figurines. Well, what really happened was that I ordered  bag of these wooden peg dolls from Amazon and put out tons of paint brushes, cheap acrylic paints, and sharpies. Then I let them go crazy.

How’d it go?

Well, we had a huge turnout for our little anime club that usually only has 3 or 4 kids — 13 total. They seemed to have fun messing around with the peg dolls, and the anime watching devolved into them playing weird YouTube interpretations of anime intros. I don’t even know. They all seemed to have fun, though, so I’m counting it as a win!